Rosemary G. Conroy Fine Art

Raven, Raven

February 1st, 2016

Force of Nature: Magic

Force of Nature: Magic

Another in a series of the stories about my paintings and the wild things that inspire them.

The raven is one of those wild creatures that inspire so many emotions! Over the eons, humans have attached so many meanings to ravens: magic, mystery, and foreboding. Is it just because they are so dark in color? Or because they are scavengers and in wilder places and more ferocious times would most likely be seen hanging around near predator kills or even more gruesomely, battlefields? In that light, it’s easy to understand their association with death, I suppose. But more modern study has uncovered a surprising depth of intelligence in all corvids, but particularly ravens.

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A good reminder at this time of year…

January 27th, 2015
10x10screechowlofjoy

The Kingdom of Joy sounds like the place for me…

 

If you are seeking, seek us with joy

For we live in the kingdom of joy.

Do not give your heart to anything else

But to the love of those who are clear joy,

Do not stray into the neighborhood of despair.

For there are hopes: they are real, they exist -

Do not go in the direction of darkness -

I tell you: suns exist.

— Rumi

And the Dreams You Dare to Dream Really Do Come True…

January 13th, 2015

Birds have led me onto strange and wonderful new directions in my life...

Birds have led me onto strange and wonderful new directions in my life…

Twenty-five years ago, a bird cast a powerful spell upon me.

I grew up in Brooklyn, NY and until the day of my complete and utter enchantment, I didn’t think there was much in the world beyond house sparrows, pigeons, and sea gulls. Not a bad metaphor for my life at the time — which was also often drab, noisy and monotonous. But through some amazing serendipity, I stumbled upon a group of bird-watchers in Prospect Park. Before that fateful day, I had never been there before — and I’m still not sure why I went. But the trip leader saw me looking at their odd little group (I had never seen bird-watchers before either) and asked me if I wanted “to see something really special.”

Now, most New Yorkers (especially young female ones) quickly learn that when a stranger poses such a question, the results are rarely pleasant. But I took a chance. And this “really special thing” turned out to be a rose-breasted grosbeak — a magenta-splashed songbird that simply stunned me with its colorful, delicate presence in such a gritty place. It was like Dorothy arriving in Oz when everything turns from black and white to technicolor. A spell was cast. I would never see the world the same way again.

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Painting of the Week: The Sea Raven Rises (Cormorant)

January 6th, 2015

The Sea Raven Rises (Cormorant)

A yes — another resolution! I really really really want to post more often so I hit upon the idea of just telling the story of a painting and I’ll try to do it once a week! So here goes:

Every summer I try really hard to find a way to spend a week on the ocean — I grew up going to the beach almost every day and I just need that fix to feel sane and right. (A week isn’t really enough but so far no one has offered me free use of their beach home so that’s what we can swing.)

We almost always go to Maine which is one of the most beautiful places in the world as far as I can tell so far! And even though the landscapes are incredibly picturesque, I never paint while I’m there. I mostly veg out and drink gin and tonics and bird-watch. This is why I need a place with a deck over-looking the ocean of course!

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Happy New Year!

December 26th, 2014

Wishing you much warmth and light at this darkest time of year…

Wondrous Beings: Mourning Dove by Rosemary G. Conroy

Do you ne’er think what wondrous beings these? Do you ne’er think who made them, and who taught The dialect they speak, where melodies Alone are the interpreters of thought? Whose household words are songs in many keys, Sweeter than instrument of man e’er caught! HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW, Tales of a Wayside Inn

At this darkest time of the year, I want to thank you for all the light you’ve shone upon me

Thank you for all your enthusiasm for my work, your on-going interest and support,

and especially to everyone who purchased a painting — wow — you’ve made this my best year ever!

I hope the coming season brings you and your loved ones much lasting joy and tons of wild beauty.

Parliament of Owls Artist Statement

November 25th, 2014
thenightislikealovelytune

The Night is Like a Lovely Tune Acrylic on panel 32 x 20″ By Rosemary G. Conroy © 2014

Back in grad school, I took an internship solely because I would get to work with a great-horned owl every day. His name was Beckett, and he had been the star of the small nature center for many years. He was blind in one eye, and very imposing, but he captured my heart and mind. Beckett was the first wild animal I had ever locked eye(s) with, and it affected me profoundly. After the internship over, I decided environmental education wasn’t really my thing, but owls? Owls would always be my thing.

Since becoming an artist, I’ve painted many portraits of these nocturnal predators, most of them with Beckett and his successor, Powell the (Barred) Owl, in mind. There’s something so moving about knowing a wild creature — about being allowed to enter, even briefly, into their world. Anyone who has bonded with a cat or dog knows what I mean — animals just operate on a different, perhaps more authentic, plane than humans. And wild birds and mammals — well, that’s a further galaxy altogether. Yet I feel so comfortable and at home around these creatures in way that I don’t always with my own species.

Most of the owls I base my paintings on are from my local wildlife rehabilitation center. These barred, barn, snowy, screech, and great-horned owls end up in there because they have been injured — typically by encounters with cars and other human structures. And while some are rescued, rehabilitated, and released back into the wild, many are not. Their injuries mean they wouldn’t survive and so they become caged ambassadors for their kind. While its regrettable, they also get to educate hundreds, if not thousands, of visitors about the owls that live around them.

So this show is part of my on-going tribute to these owls. I set some of them in flight because they seem truer that way. And others are portraits so my viewers may get a tiny glimpse of what’s it’s like to lock eyes with these fierce, feathered, and fabulous beings.

As I was working on the show, I discovered that a gathering of owls is called a “parliament.” The titles for the smaller paintings come from my imagining what kind of governing body owls might set up for themselves!

I Hope You Love Birds Too

March 21st, 2014

A recent painting by Rosemary G. Conroy

“I hope you love birds too. It is economical. It saves going to heaven.” — Emily Dickinson

I found the above quote while I was looking for inspiration for titles for a set of new paintings I had just completed. It was perfect! Thank you, Emily Dickinson, because I do love birds too.

I started this new painting series with the idea of birds as my local deities, as my personal heroes — because, well, they are. These fragile little beings find their way, live their lives against the backdrop of this complicated world we humans have created — and it blows my mind. How come they are never discouraged by the destruction of habitat, by the endless pollution, by the crazy ways the global climate is changing? Yes, they don’t have the same brains or perceptions that we do perhaps — but still. They must notice, they must feel, and yet they persist. They sing anyway and make nests out of trash and keep trying to live their lives no matter what obstacles are placed in their path.

Yep. Birds give me hope. They give me joy with their songs and their beauty and just their being. I try to give back a little by painting their portraits. By honoring them with my artwork and exhibiting it in the world so others might understand how so very precious these creatures (all creatures really) are. I keep thinking of moving onto other subjects but I can’t. My work is not done yet apparently.

Birds have become like a religion for me. In fact, I don’t think I could live in a world without birds anymore. Anytime I go someplace new or strange, I scan for birds — even just a gull or a pigeon. If they can make it here, then I know I’ll be OK too. When I am someplace with lots of birds, I feel completely relaxed and comfortable. When my mother died, I asked her — in that time when a loved one’s energy is still close by even though they are physically gone — to send me red-tailed hawks so I know she is still with me somehow. I feel great comfort when I spy one as I’m traveling or one shows up unexpectedly in my backyard.

So you’re right Emily, it does save going to heaven. In so many ways…